Scheme of Teaching & Examination

 

 

 

 

and

 

 

 

 

Syllabi

 

 

 

 

of

 

 

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

(2004-2005)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


GURU GOBIND SINGH INDRAPRASTHA UNIVERSITY

KASHMERE GATE, DELHI-110 006

 

 

 

 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

Course Code

Course Name

L

T/P

Credits

GROUP A

FOUNDATION COURSES

 

 

 

B. Ed. 101

Education in Emerging Indian Society

4

-

4

B. Ed. 102

Psychology of Learner and Teaching –Learning Process

4

-

4

B. Ed. 103

System and Issues in Indian Education

4

-

4

B. Ed. 104

Curriculum and Instruction

4

-

4

B. Ed. 105

Computer in Education

3

-

3

GROUP B

PADAGOGICAL COURSES

 

 

 

Group B (i)

Subject specific Methodology courses – Any TWO from the following

 

 

 

B. Ed. 106

Teaching of Hindi

4

-

4

B. Ed. 107

Teaching of English

4

-

4

B. Ed. 108

Teaching of Sanskrit

4

-

4

B. Ed. 109

Teaching of Social Sciences

4

-

4

B. Ed. 110

Teaching of Integrated Sciences

4

-

4

B. Ed. 111

Teaching of Physics

4

-

4

B. Ed. 112

Teaching of Chemistry

4

-

4

B. Ed. 113

Teaching of Mathematics

4

-

4

B. Ed. 114

Teaching of Life Science

4

-

4

B. Ed. 115

Teaching of History

4

-

4

B. Ed. 116

Teaching of Political Science

4

-

4

B. Ed. 117

Teaching of Economics

4

-

4

B. Ed. 118

Teaching of Geography

4

-

4

B. Ed. 119

Teaching of Business Studies

4

-

4

B. Ed. 120

Teaching of Accountancy

4

-

4

B. Ed. 121

Teaching of Home Science

4

-

4

Group B (ii)

Advanced Level Content – cum Methodology Courses*

4

-

4

GROUP C

ELECTIVE COURSES

(Any ONE of the following)

 

 

 

B. Ed. 135

Elementary Education

3

-

3

B. Ed. 136

Assessment, Evaluation and Remedial

3

-

3

B. Ed. 137

Educational guidance and Counseling

3

-

3

B. Ed. 138

Education of Children with Special needs

3

-

3

B. Ed. 139

Educational Technology

3

-

3

B. Ed. 140

Value Education and Education for Human Rights

3

-

3

B. Ed. 141

Environmental Education

3

-

3

B. Ed. 142

Population Education

3

-

3

B. Ed. 143

Educational Administration & Management

3

-

3

B. Ed. 144

Educational Entrepreneurship**

3

-

3

B. Ed. 145

School Education**

3

-

3


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

                                                                                  ŸŸŸ

Course Code

Course Name

L

T/P

Credits

 

 

 

 

 

GROUP D

PRACTICAL COURSES

 

 

 

B. Ed. 151

Teaching Skill Development – I

-

-

4

B. Ed. 152

Teaching Skill Development – II

-

-

4

B. Ed. 153

Practicum related to Theory Courses

-

-

8

B. Ed. 154

Sessional Works & Viva Voce

-

-

6

B. Ed. 155

Work Experience

-

-

2

B. Ed. 156

Co-curriculum Activities & Sports

-

-

2

B. Ed. 157

Working with the Community

-

-

2

 

Total

30

ŸŸŸ

58

 

*Any one of the Advanced Level Content – cum- Methodology Course from Group B(ii) (See, please Annexe: I) can also be opted by those who possess the Master’s degree in lieu of any One the subjects specified in Group B(i) provided there are at least 10 students in that subject and/or any Institute has the required facilities for opting that particular course without disturbing the basis/bases on which admissions have been finalized during the academic session 2001-02. The syllabi of the subject/s that is actually opted in any Institute/College shall be made available by the Dean Academic Affairs  on demand.

 

**The relevant syllabi shall be made available by the Dean Academic Affairs on demand.

 

ŸŸŸThe time – slots for these practical courses shall be provided in the Time Table for B. Ed. Programmes in such a manner so that the students stay at their respective campuses at least            7 hours on each working day.

 

Note:

 

1.      The total number of the credits of the B. Ed. programme = 58.

2.      Each student shall be required to appear for examinations in all courses. However, for the award of the degree a student shall be required to earn the minimum of 54 Credits.

 

Annexe – I

 

List of Advanced Level Content – cum Methodology Courses

 

B. Ed. 122 - Hindi

B. Ed. 123 - English

B. Ed. 124 - Sanskrit

B. Ed. 125 - Physics

B. Ed. 126 - Chemistry

B. Ed. 127 - Life-Sciences

B. Ed. 128 - Mathematics

B. Ed. 129 - Political Science

B. Ed. 130 - Economics

B. Ed. 131 - History

B. Ed. 132 - Geography

B. Ed. 133 - Business Studies

B. Ed. 134 - Accountancy


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATION IN EMERGING INDIAN SOCIETY

 

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 101                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Course Objectives

 

To enable the student-teachers understand:

·         the relationship between philosophy and education and the implications of philosophy on education.

·         the importance and role of education in the progress of Indian society

·         contribution of great educationists- both Indian and Western to the process of education

·         the need and importance to study education is a sociological perspective

·         the means and measures to the promotion of national integration, international understanding and protection of human rights.

·         the kind of education required to build a new social order.

 

 

Course Content

 

Unit 1 Philosophy of Education

-          Meaning of Philosophical inquiry and need for Philosophy of Education.

-          Meaning and nature, aims and purposes of education in relation to time and place.

-          Educational implications of Schools of Philosophy (naturalism, Idealism, Pragmatism and humanism) with reference to basic postulates, aims, curriculum, methods and discipline.

-          Education according to Indian thinkers-Gandhi, Tagore, Vivekananda, Aurobindo, J. Krishnamurthy and Gijju Bhai.

-          Education according to Western thinkers-Rousseau, Dewey, Frobel, and Pestalozzi.

 

 

Unit 2 Sociology and Education in the Indian Context

 

-          Sociological basis of education.

-          Aspiration of Indian Society

-          Role and functions of home, school community, religion, media and state as agents of socialization.

-          Education as an agent of social change, social adjustment and socio-economic development.

 

 

 

 

Unit 3 Education, Culture and Human Values

 

-          Values in education

-          Meaning and classification of values. Nature of moral and ethical values.

-          Value oriented Education.

-          Value crisis and role of education in resolving value crisis (inculcating values-socio-cultural sensitivity.

-          Culture and Education

-          Meaning and characteristics of culture and its relationship with education.

-          Indian cultural Heritage and education as an instrument for conservation and development of culture.

-          Cultural pluralism, cultural lag, cultural conflict, ambivalence and tolerance.

 

 

Unit 4 Democracy and Education

 

-          Philosophical analysis of the concepts of equality, freedom, democracy, authority and discipline.

-          Human rights education with reference to child’s rights.

 

 

Unit 5 Education and Integration

 

-          Role of teacher and Educational Institutions in securing National Integration and promoting International peace and understanding.

 

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.      Saiyidain, K. G. (1970), Facts of Indian Education, New Delhi: NCERT.

2.      Ross, James (1962), Groundwork of Educational Theory, London: George Harre and Sons.

3.      Nun, T. P. (1968), Education, its Data and First Principles, London: Edward Arnold.

4.      Mohanti, J. (1987), Democracy and Education in India, New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publishers.

5.      Tyagi, P. N. (1991), Education for All: A graphic Presentation, New Delhi: NIEPA.

6.      Govt. of India (1993), Education for All: The Indian Scene, Widentry Horizons, New Delhi: MHRD.

7.      Nayar, P. R., Dave, P.N., and Arora, K. (1982), Teacher and Education in Emerging Indian Society, New Delhi.

8.      Ram Murti Acharya (1990), Towards an Enlightened and Humane Society – A Committee Report, New Delhi MHRD.

9.      Ruhela, S. P. (1969), Social Determinants of Educability in India, New Delhi: Jain Publishers.

10.  Srimali, K. L. (1970), The Prospects for Democracy in India, Southern Illinois: University Press.

11.  Bhatacharya and Sriniwas (1977), Society and Education, Calcutta : Academic Publishers.

12.  Durkhiem, Emile (1956), Education and Sociology, New York: Free Press.

13.  Dagar, B. S., Shiksha Tatha Manav Mulya (Hindi), Chandigarh: Haryana Sahitya Academy.

14.  Dagar, B. S. and Dhull, Indira (1994), Perspective in Moral Education, New Delhi: Uppal Publishing House.

15.  Delors, Jacques (1996), Learning: The Treasure Within, Paris: UNESCO.

16.  Musgrave, P. W. (Ed.) (1970), Sociology, History and Education, Mathuen & Co. Ltd. London.

17.  Butler, Donald, J., Four Philosophies and Their Practical in Education and Religion.

18.  Udaishankar, Philosophy of Education for Modern India.

19.  Brubacker, John S. (1950), Modern Philosophies of Education, New York: McGraw Hills.

20.  Dewey, John (1963), Democracy and Education, New York: Mac Millan.

21.  Dewey, John (1973), The School and Society, Chicago, University Press.

22.  Govt. of India (1986), National Policy on Education, New Delhi (MHRD).

23.  Govt. of India (1966), Report of the Education Commission, Ministry of Education, New Delhi.

24.  Mathur, D.S.A. (1966), Sociological approach to Indian Education, Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNER & TEACHING – LEARNING PROCESS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 102                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Objectives- This course will help student-teachers:

·         Acquire knowledge about psychological perspective on the teaching-learning process.

·         Understand the learner, his needs and interests, development and his social background.

·         Develop an understanding of theories of learning and intelligence

·         Develop skills for using psychological tests especially intelligence tests.

·         Improve their teaching-learning in classroom context.

 

 

Course Contents

 

Unit I -  Psychology & the Teaching-Learning Process.

 

        Meaning and scope of educational psychology.

        Importance of educational psychology for teachers.

 

Unit II – General Principles of Growth & Development.

 

-          Concept of growth & development.

-          Principles of growth & development.

-          Various stages of development from infancy to adolescence with special reference to Piaget, Ericson and Kohlberg.

-          Characteristics and problems of adolescents, aspects of adolescents’ development – physical, cognitive, emotional, social and moral etc.

Unit III – Understanding the Learner.

 

-          Understanding the learner in the light of interests, needs, individual differences and personality development with a special reference of Freud’s theory.

 

Unit IV – Intelligence and Motivation

 

-         Nature, characteristics and types of motivation; techniques of increasing learner motivation; Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

-         Intelligence: Meaning and nature; theories of intelligence (two-factor, group factor, multi-factor).

-         Measurement of intelligence; types of intelligence tests-verbal, non-verbal; performance test etc.

 

Unit V – Learning and Teaching – Learning Process

 

-          Concept of learning and teaching-learning process.

-          Approaches to learning:

a.      Behaviouristic : (Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner)

b.      Cognitive : Gestalt

c.      Humanistic : (Maslow’s, Roger,)

d.      Constructivism

-          Factors influencing learning: Learner, Teacher, School & Home

 

Unit VI – Learners with special needs – Role of Guidance & Counselling.

 

-         Identification of Gifted, Handicapped learners and Role of the Teacher in helping them.

-         Meaning & nature of guidance & counseling

-         Types & techniques of guidance & counseling – educational, vocational & personal.

 

Unit VII – Evaluation

 

-         Concept of evaluation

-         Approaches to evaluation – Formative, Summative, Diagnostic, Norm referenced and criterion referenced

-         Tools of evaluation – Observation, Interview, and Self reporting techniques.

-         Construction of Achievement tests, blue print, types of items, item analysis.

-         Elementary concept on normal distribution curve & co-relation.

-         Statistical analysis – Calculation of Mean, Median, percentiles, standard deviations & uses of these measures.

-         Characteristics of a good tool – Reliability, Validity, Practicability

-         Teacher made and standardized tests

 

Suggested Readings:

 

1.      Bhatia, H. R. (1977), Textbook of Educational Psychology, The McMillan Company of India Ltd., New Delhi.

2.      Aggarwal, J. C. (1995), Essential Educational Psychology, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

3.      Chauhan, S. S. (1988), Advanced Educational Psychology,  Vikas Publication, New Delhi.

4.      Sharma, K. N. (1990), Systems, Theories and Modern Trends in Psychology, HPB, Agra.

5.      Rao s. Narayan (1990), Educational Psychology, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi.

6.      Dececco, J. P. (1977), The Psychology of Learning and Instruction, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

7.      Kale, S. V. (1983), Child Psychology and Child Guidance, Himalaya Publishing House, Giragoan, Bombay.

8.      Kakkar, S. B. (1989), Educational Psychology & Guidance, The Indian Publication, Hill Road, Ambala, Cantt.

9.      Mangal, S. K., Educational Psychology.

10. Sprinthal & Sprinthal, Educational Psychology – Developmental Approach.

11. Bruce, Joyce & Weils & Howers, Models of Teaching.

12. Garrett, H. E., Statistics in Psychology and Education.

13. Mangal, S. K., Introduction to Statistics in Education.

14. Boaz, G. D., Educational Psychology.

15. Chauhan, S. S., Mental Hygiene.

16. Hurlock Elizabeth, Developmental  Psychology

17. Dandekar, W. N. , Psychological Foundations of Education

18. Crow & Crow, Educational Psychology.

19. Soch & Gupta, Educational Pyschology.

20. Simpson, R. C., Fundamentals of Educational Psychology.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

SYSTEM AND ISSUES IN INDIAN EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 103                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Objective:

-          To acquaint the prospective Teachers with the educational policies and programme during the past – Independent period.

-          Equip them to understand the forces affecting educational system.

-          Enable them to understand the role of education in human resource development.

-          Develop competencies to understand the various issues related to education and remidation   measures.

-          Develop vision for futuristic programme in education.

 

Course content

 

Unit-I               Education status in India between 1813-1950

o        Indigenous Education

o        Charter – 1813

o        Macaulay’s Minutes

o        Wood’s Despatch

o        Hunter Commission

o        Sadler Commission

o        Basic Education

o        Sergeant Plan

 

Unit-II              Issues in Indian Education

o        Constitutional provisions of education in India with special reference to article 45 (UEE)

o        Elementary Education (including pre-primary)

i)        Development in Five Year Plans

ii)       Wastage and stagnation

iii)     Kothari Commission – 1966

iv)     Yashpal Committee

v)      POA 1992

 

Unit-III             Secondary Education

o        Vocationalisation of Secondary Education

o        10+2+3 system

o        Common School System Multipurpose School

o        Neighbourhood School

o        Three Language Formula

o        Navodaya Vidyalaya, Kendriya Vidyalaya

o        POA 1992

o        Role of CBSE, SCERT, NCERT, DIET

 

 

 

Unit-IV                        Critical Concerns of Higher Education

o        Student Unrest

o        Examination Reforms

o        Role of NCTE & UGC

 

Unit-V             Special Concerns in Indian Education

o        Non-Formal Education

o        Women Education for Gender Equality

 

Unit-VI                        School Organization and Management

o        School Plant

o        Preparation of Time Table

o        Organization of Co-curricular Activities

o        Role of Principal, Teacher and Community. (including PTA)

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.      Nurulle S & Naik J. P. (1981), Students – History of Education in India, Bombay: Macmillan.

2.      Rawat ,P. H. (1989), History of Education in India, Agra: Ram Prasad & Sons.

3.      Gandhi, M. K. (1951), Basic Education, Ahmedabad : Navjeevan Publishing House.

4.      Naik J. P. (1976),  Elementary Education in India: A Promise to Keep, New Delhi: Allied Publishers.

5.      Dharampal (1983), The Beautiful Tree, New Delhi: Biblia Impex Pvt. Ltd.

6.      Mohanty (1982), Indian Education in the Emerging Society, New Delhi: Sterling Publications.

7.      Report of the Committee on Religious and Moral Education, Ministry of Education, Govt. of India, 1960 (Sri Prakasa Committee)

8.      Report of the Secondary Education Commission 1952-1953, Ministry of Education, Govt. of India, 1956.

9.      Report of the Education Commission, 1964-66, Education and National Development, Ministry of Education, Govt. of India, 1966.

10.  Ministry of Education, Govt. of India (1985), Challenge of Education – A Policy Perspective, New Delhi.

11.  Deptt. of Education (1986), Programme of Action – National Policy on Education, New Delhi,  Govt. of India, MHRD.

12.  Noyle, M.C. (1966), Education & the Nation, Bombay : Allied Publishers.

13.  Mitter, V.S. (1977), Education & the Future of India,  Ambala Cant: The Indian Publications.

14.  Mohanty Jagannath , Indian Education in the Emerging Society – 1982 Modern Trends in Indian Education – 1988.

15.  Mudaliar A. L. (1960), Education in India, Bombay.

16.  Naik (1979), Equality, Quality & Quantity, Bombay: Allied Publishers.

17.  Nanda S. K. (1982), Indian Education its Problems Tools.

18.  Safaya R.N. (1989), Current Problems in Indian Education, Jallandhar: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

19.  Lakshmi S. (1989), Challenge in Indian Education, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Ltd.

20.  NCERT (1986), School Education in India (Present Status & Futures Needs), New Delhi.

21.  Aggarwal J. C., The Progress of Education in Free India.

22.  Bhagwan Dayal, The Development of Modern Indian Education, Bombay, Orient Longmans.

23.  Harap Henry, Improvement of Curriculum in Indian Schools, New Delhi, Ministry of Education, Government of India.

24.  Jayaramam, M., Stagnation and Wastage in Primary Schools, New Delhi, NCERT, 1957.

25.  Mukherji, Dr. S. N., Education in India – Today and Tomorrow, Baroda, Acharya Book Depot.

26.  Ranganathan, S. R., School and College Libraries, Madras, Madras Library Association.

27.  Report of the National Seminar on Wastage and Stagnation, Held at NCERT in 1968.

28.  Education of Primary Teachers in India, Report of the First National Seminar, New Delhi, Ministry of education, Government of India, 1960.

29.  Reports of the following Education Commissions:

(c)   University Education Commission, 1949.

(d)   Secondary Education Commission, 1953.

(e)   Indian Education Commission, 1968.

30.  Safaya, R. N. and Bhatia, B. D., School Organisation and Administration, Delhi, Dhanpat Rai and Sons.

31.  Saidain, K. G., Problems of Educational Reconstruction, Bombay, Asia Publishing House.

32.  Second Indian Year Book on Education – Elementary Education, New Delhi, NCERT, 1964.

33.  Subba Rao, Dr. C. S., Education in Practice, Secunderabad, Ajanta Publications, 1960.

34.  Subba Rao, Dr. C. S. , Education in Practice, Secunderabad, Ajanta Publications, 1960.

35.  Thirtha, Dr. N. V., Babel and the Language Dilemma in Indian Schools.

36.  Altekar, Education in ancient India.

37.  Naik, J. P., Elementary Education in India.

38.  Sharma, R. C. and Sapra, C. L., Wastage and Stagnation.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 104                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Course Objectives

Enable the student-teacher

-          To understand need and significance of curriculum in education

-          To understand the process of designing curriculum for secondary/senior secondary level.

-          To understand of various techniques for transaction of curriculum.

-          To develop various tools and techniques for evaluation

-          To acquire and use the skills of teaching

 

 

Course Content

 

Unit 1 Curriculum Development

 

-          Concept and nature of curriculum.

-          Process of curriculum development.

-          Curriculum planning

-          Factors influencing curriculum planning

-          Curriculum effectiveness and efficiency

 

 

Unit 2 Transaction

 

-    Curriculum development versus curriculum transaction

-          Instruction and learning: basic concept

-          Instructional design

-          Instructional objectives: three domains-cognitive, affective and psychomotor

-          Systems approach

 

Unit 3 Instructional Methods

 

·         Teacher–Controlled Instruction (TCI): meaning and nature, various methods (lecture and demonstration), strengths and weaknesses of each method, process/procedure for organising effective lecture and demonstration, assessment of lectures and demonstrations, role of teachers in TCI.

·         Learner–Controlled Instructions (LCI): meaning and nature, self-learning, methods of self-learning (self-instructional print material, Keller’s plan, programmed instruction and computer assisted instruction), organising LCI (demonstration and examples) assessment of LCI, teachers’ role in LCI.

·         Group–Controlled Instruction (GCI): meaning and nature, various methods (small group interaction, co-operative learning approach, role play, field trips, tutorial, project work), organisation of GCI, problems in organising GCI, role of teachers in organising GCI.

 

 

Unit 4

 

Skills and Competencies: Concept and nature, various skills/competencies required by a secondary school teacher, (core skills: explaining, questions, reinforcement, stimulus variation, and special skills (learner-related and subject related), development of skills and competencies, micro-teaching (concept, organisation and evaluation).

 

 

Unit 5

 

Means of Instruction Delivery: Teaching aids, models, charts, graphs, field strips, OHP, audio (telephone, ratio and cassettes), video (television and cassettes), computer, skills related to use of electronic and non-electronic media, development of courseware.

 

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.      Bhat, B. D. (1995), Modern Methods of Teaching, Delhi : Kanishka Publications.

2.      Joseph, C. Mukalel (1998), Creative Approaches to Class Room Teaching New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.

3.      Gronlund, N.E. (1976), Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching, Macmillan Co.

4.      Chritian, Jyoti, A. (1991), Managing Class Rooms : An Instructional Perspective, The Indian Publication.

5.      McNell, John D. & Wiles, John (1990), The Essentials of Teaching: Decisions, Plans and Methods, New York: Macmillan.

6.      Romiszowaski, A. J. (1988), The Selection Guide and Use of Instructional Media, London: Kogan Page.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

                       

COMPUTER IN EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 105                                                          L-3        T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Objectives

After undergoing this course the students will be able to:

·     Work with computers to enhance interactive teaching/learning skills

·     Work with various MS Office Applications like Word, Excel and Power Point

·     Brows the internet and conduct research for their lessons

·     Manage access to digital resources in a computer enabled classroom

·     Evaluate digital lesson plans, projects, presentations and research

·     Use computers in educational planning and designing curriculum and units.

 

Recommended Contents

Unit I - Introduction to Computers – hardware, software, types of computes, basics of computer architecture, computer aided learning

 

Unit II- Various ways of using computers in education.  Instruction Design and Technology

Working with computers to enhance interactive teaching/learning skills:

·     Higher Order Thinking Skills

·     Curriculum framing questions

·     Problem Based Learning

·     Backward Design

 

Unit III-Using computer software MS Word for student learning

 

Unit IV- Using Computer software MS Excel for student learning

 

Unit V- Using computer software MS Power Point for student learning

 

Unit VI

·     Using internet for research

·     Using Internet communication tools in classroom

·     Evaluating software and web resources for effective teaching/learning

·     Ensuring safe use of the Internet

·     Legal and copyright issues regarding downloading material from the internet.

 

Unit VII- Management of access to computer/internet resources in a computer enabled classroom

 

Unit VIII- Evaluation of computer / internet based student projects, presentations and research work

 

Unit IX-Using computers in educational planning and administration

 

Evaluation: The total marks allocated to this paper is 100.  The students will be evaluated for Theory Part through Final Examination of 75 marks and the Practical Part carrying 25 marks as Internal Assessment on the basis of a Unit Test on Word, Excel and Power Point and a project on Internet Research.

 

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF HINDI

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 106                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF ENGLISH

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 107                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Objective:

 

Unit I - The nature of the English Language

a)               Its distinctive features

b)               Contrastive analysis of English against Hindi

c)       The scope of English in (i) India (ii) Globally

 

 

Unit II- The place of English in the Indian school curriculum especially in the context of the three language formula.

a)               The principles of teaching English as a second language and their application in the Indian context.

b)               The priority to developing language skills, aural-oral approach, situational teaching, structural grading, vocabulary control pattern practice, judicious use of mother tongue in the initial years.

c)               The objectives of teaching English in different school contexts at different stages

d)               Learner centred approaches and methods of teaching.

i)                    Difference between an “approach”, a “method’ and a “technique”.

ii)                   The grammar translation method and its replacement by direct method.

iii)                 The structural approach – its merits and limitations

iv)                 Latest developments in the approaches to and methods of teaching especially the communicative approach.

 

Unit III- The methods and materials for developing the language skills.

(a)             Aural – Oral skills

(b)             Writing skills

(c)              Reading skills

 

Unit IV- Activities in Teaching of English

(a)             Situationalization

(b)             Dramatizaiton

(c)             Projects

(d)             Language games

(e)             Integration of English with other subjects and school activities.

 


Unit V- Transactional strategies

(a)            Preparation of lesson plans in English with special reference to general and specific objectives in terms of children’s behaviour.

(b)            Maintaining the interactive environment in the English classroom.

(c)            The insightful application of teaching aids and their preparation.

(d)            Teaching language through literature and inculcating the habit of reading in the classroom

Unit VI- Remedial and enrichment control

(a)             Meaning of remedial teaching.

(b)              Strategies for removal of errors in spelling, sentence and structure and pronunciation.

Unit VII- Evaluation:

(a)            Basic principles of testing English language proficiency: The global and the ‘discrete’ point approach. The difference between measurement and evaluation

(b)            The meaning and significance of comprehensive and continuous evaluation in English

(c)            Development of good test items in English (objective type, short answer type, essay type)

(d)            Preparation of an achievement test

(e)            Analysis and interpretation of data obtained from achievement test

(f)              Curriculum and Textbooks – English in secondary School curriculum, review of English readers in use, development of instructional material.

(g)            Instructional Planning.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF SANSKRIT

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 108                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 109                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

 

Objective:  Enable the student-teacher to:

 

- understand the nature of social science

- understand the need for teaching social science as an integrated discipline

- develop certain professional skill useful for class room teaching

- understand learner centered approach in teaching of social science

 

Course Content

 

1. STRUCTURE AND DISCIPLINE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

a. Meaning and Nature  of Social Science

b. Development and scope of Social Science

c. Approaches to the study of Social Science

 

2. OBJECTIVE BASED TEACHING

 

(i) Aims and objectives of teaching Social Science

(ii) Types of objectives

(iii) Writing specific objectives of teaching social science in behavioural terms

 

3. LEARNER CENTERED AND ACTIVITY BASED APPROACH

 

(i) Conceptual  learning in social science-perception and social science larnings.

(ii) Approaches in social science teaching, expository approach – story telling, problem solving approach,  discovery approach, project method

(iii) Individualised instruction

4. PADAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

(i) Pedagogical analysis of a unit from enrichment content

(ii) Identification and classification of the concept from one of the above mentioned units.

 

5. CURRICULUM PLANNING IN SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

(i) Guideline for course construction

(ii) Correlation and integration among different social sciences

(iii) Analysis of social science curriculum

(iv) Social science text book and its evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

6. TRANSACTIONAL STRATEGIES

 

(i) Preparation of lesson plans

(ii) Preparation of unit plans

(iii) Individual differences-group and individual learning

 

7. TEACHING AIDS

     Teaching board, models, maps, scrap books, mass media

 

8. CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

     Excursion, bulletin board, social science exhibition, uses of community resources.

 

9. EVALUATION

 

(i) Comprehensive and continuous evaluation

(ii) Development of test items, essay, short answers and objective type &   achievement test.

(iii) Diagnostic testing and remedial measures

 

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

 

1.      Bining, A.C. and Bining, D.H. (1952), Teaching the Social Studies in Secondary School, N.Y.: McGraw Hill   Book Company

2.      Choudhary, K. P. (1975), The effective Teaching of History in India, New Delhi: NCERT.

3.      Dhanija Neelam (1993), Multimedia Approaches in Teaching Social Studies, New Delhi: Harmen Publishing House.

4.      Dixit and Bughela, H. (1972), Itihas Shikshan, Jaipur: Hindi Granth Academy.

5.      Fenton, Edwin (1967), The New Social Studies, New York: Ho Rinehart, Winston, Inc.

6.      NCERT, (1988), Guidelines and Syllabi for Secondary Stage (Class IX, X), New Delhi: NCERT.

7.      Kochar, S. K. (1963), The Teaching of Social Studies, Delhi: University Publishers.

8.      Mofatt, M.R. (1955), Social Studies Instruction, New York: Prentice Hall.

9.      Mouley, D.S. Rajput Sarla & Verma, P.S. (1990) NCERT (1968), Nagrik Shastra Shikshan, National Curriculum for Primary & Secondary Education: A Frame Work, Revised Version, New Delhi: NCERT.

10.  Quillen, I.J. & Hanna, L. A. (1943), Education for Social Competence, Curriculum Sc Instruction in Secondary School Social Study. Chicago: Scott, Foreman & Co.

11.  Ruhela, S. P. & Khan, R.S., Samajik Vigyan Shikshan, Kota Open University, BE-5.

12.  UNESCO (1981), Handbook for Teaching of Social Studies, Paris: UNESCO.

13.  Slev, E.B. (1950), Teaching Social Studies in High School, Boston: DC., Heath & Co.

 

FURTHER READINGS

1.      Bossing, N.L. (1970), Teaching in Secondary School, New Delhi: Amerinal Publishing Co. Pvt.

2.      Branard, M. C. (1953), Principles and Practice of Geography Teaching, London: University Tutorial Press.

3.      Burton, W. H. (1953), Principles and Practice of Geography Teaching, London: University Totorial Press.

4.      Burton, W.H. (1972), Principles of History Teaching, London: Methuen.

5.      Buch, M.B. (1969), Improving Instruction in Civics, New Delhi: NCERT.

6.      Callahan, J.I. Dark, L.H. (1982), Teaching in the Middle Secondary Schools Planning for Competence, New York.

7.      Clark, L.H. Stare, I.S. (1967), Secondary School Teaching Methods, London: University Tutorial Press.

8.      Khan, R. S. and Ahmad, I. (Eds) (1995), Lesson Planning, New Delhi: IASE, JMI.

9.      Lee, N. (Ed.) (1975), Teaching Economics, London: Heinenmann Educational Books.

10.  Lewis, E.M. (1960), Teaching History in Secondary School, Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

11.  Verma, O.P. (1981), Geography Teaching, New Delhi.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF INTEGRATED SCIENCES

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 110                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

This course deals with the entire range of activities associated with the teaching of sciences at the secondary level. The emphasis has been on knowledge, understanding and application of the various approaches/methods strategies and skill components associated with science teaching. The teaching-learning process has not to be dealt with in isolation but to be illustrated by integrating with subject content selected from important topics/concepts from science curriculum at secondary level. This helps in better understanding and application of instructional strategies in teaching learning process. The specific instructional objectives and unit-wise content are given as under:

 

Course Objectives

 

The student-teacher will be able to

 

-         familiarize themselves with nature of science and objectives of teaching of science at School level.

-         understand the importance of science in school curriculum

-         plan instructions effectively for teaching of science

-         know and apply various techniques/approaches of teaching the content of science.

-         evaluate students performance effectively with reliability and validity.

 

Unit 1 Science in School Curriculum

 

a.       Nature of Science

b.      Objectives of teaching of science

c.       Science curriculum – its significance at secondary level

d.      Science education in India

e.       Curriculum and Textbooks – Meaning, nature, principles. Defects in the existing school science curriculum. Good Science Textbooks – qualities.

 

Unit 2 Approaches and Methods of Teaching of Science

 

a.      Enquiry and problem solving approach

b.      Lecture-cum demonstration method

c.      Laboratory method

d.      Project method

 

 

 

 

Unit 3 Planning and Designing for Effective Instructions in Science

 

a.      Planning for instructional process – need, advantages and strategies

b.      Lesson planning – design, approaches & writing the lesson plan

c.      Preparation and use of teaching aids and computer assisted learning.

d.      Use and management of science laboratory

 

 

Unit 4 Activities in Integrated Science

            Integration of Integrated Science with other subjects and School activities.

 

Unit 5 Illustrations of Teaching-learning process in science.

 

a.      Teaching of Physics

b.      Teaching of Chemistry

c.      Teaching of Biology

 

 

Unit 6 Evaluation in Science

 

a.      Evaluation and assessment-concept and importance in science

b.      Techniques of assessment for theory and practicals

c.      Construction and administration of theory and practical tests

d.      Monitoring of learners’ progress

e.      Diagnostic tests and remedial measures in science.

f.        Unit test preparation

 

Unit 6 Practical Oriented Assignments (Any One)

 

a.      Planning and organization of science laboratory

b.      Planning, construction, and execution of test for theory and practicals

c.      Live demonstration of an experiment in the class-room

d.      Co-curricular activities and their role in teaching of science.

 

Bibliography

 

1.      Das, R. C. (1985), Science Teaching in Schools, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

2.      Thurber & Cullette, Teaching Science in Today’s School

3.      Sharma, R. C. (1990), Modern Science Teaching,  New Delhi: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

4.      Thurber, W. A. & Collette, A. T. (1967), Teaching Science in Today’s Secondary Schools, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.

5.      Mangal, S. K. (1995), Teaching of Physical and Life Science, New Delhi: Avg Book Depot, Karol Bagh.

6.      Sharma, R.C. (1995), Modern Science Teaching,  Delhi: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF PHYSICS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 111                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

 

 

Course Content

 

1.      Nature of Physics and Significance of Teaching it

(i)                  Nature and scope of Physics

(ii)                Significance of teaching physics in secondary and senior secondary schools.

 

2.      Aims and Objectives of Teaching Physics

(i)                  Meaning and need of objective based teaching

(ii)                General aims of teaching physics at senior secondary level

(iii)               Classification of educational objectives with reference to Bloom’s Taxonomy

(iv)              Writing specific objectives in behavioural form in Physics

 

3.      Approaches and Methods of Teaching Physics

(i)                  Concept approach – meaning of concept, concept formation with reference to J. Bruner and Hilda Taba

(ii)                Process approach – teaching science as a process, scientific method, problem solving method.

(iii)               Cooperative learning approach

(iv)              Activity based approach – investigatory approach, project method, laboratory method

(v)                Individualised instruction – computer-assisted-instruction

(vi)              Demonstration-cum-discussion method

(vii)             Constructivist approach

 

 

4.      Pedagogical Analysis of Content

 

(i)                  Meaning and need of pedagogical analysis of content

(ii)                Identification of concepts

(iii)               Developing learning experiences/activities

 

 

5.      Planning a Lesson

 

(i)                  Importance of planning

(ii)                Basic steps in lesson planning

(iii)               Planning a lesson for unit, a day, and individual experiment, with special emphasis on general objectives.

 

 

6.      Physics Curriculum

 

(i)                  Principles of curriculum construction

(ii)                Characteristics of a good curriculum

(iii)               A critical study of present Physics curriculum at secondary/senior secondary school

(iv)              Textbook in Physics – its need and use, evaluation of a textbook

 

 

7.      Teaching Aids in Physics

 

(i)                  Importance of teaching aids

(ii)                Use of audio-visual aids in teaching of Physics with special reference to new technologies like interactive TV, computer aided instruction

(iii)               Use of community resources

(iv)                Preparing low cost aids

 

8.      Activities in Physics

 

(i)                  Importance of co-curricular activities

(ii)                Science club, science quiz, bulletin board, excursion, science fair/exhibition

 

9.      Integration of Physics with other School subjects and School activities

 

10.  Evaluation of Learners’ Progress

 

(i)                  Evaluation and measurement

(ii)                Comprehensive and continuous evaluation, need and importance of class tests

(iii)               Different type of tests-essay, short answer, objective types

(iv)              Achievement test – its construction, administration and item analysis

(v)                Reliability and validity of a test

(vi)              Remedial Teaching

 

Suggested Readings

 

Ø      Anderson R.D. (1970), Developing Children’s Thinking Through Science, New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

Ø      Barbe, R.H. (1995), Science in the Multicultural Class room, Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Ø      Chauhan, S.S. (2000), Innovation in Teaching Learning Process, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Ø      Edigar M. and Rao D.B. (1996), Science Curriculum, New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.

Ø      Gupta N.K. (1997), Research in Teaching of Science, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation.

Ø      Kochar, S.K. (1997), Methods and Techniques of Teaching, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Ø      Maitre, K. (1991), Teaching of Physics, New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.

Ø      Mukalel, J.C. (1998), Creative Approaches to Classroom Teaching,  New  Delhi:  Discovery Publishing House.

Ø      Prakash, R. and Rath, T.N. (1996), Emerging Trends in Teaching of Physics,  New Delhi: Kanisha Publishers.

Ø      Rao, D.B. (1997), Reflections on Scientific Attitudes, New Delhi: Discovery Publishing Hosue.

Ø      Romey, W.D. (1968), Inquiry Technique for Teaching of Science, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Ø      Sharma, R.C. (1981), Modern Science Teaching, Delhi: Dhanpat Rai and Sons.

Ø      Thurber, W.A. and Collette, A.T. (1970), Teaching Science in Today’s  Secondary Schools, Boston: Allyn & Bacon Inc.

Ø      Vanaja, M. (1999), Inquiry Training Model, New Delhi: Discovery Publishing   House.

Ø       Venkataiah, N. (1993), Curricular Innovations for 2000 AD, New Delhi: Ashish Publishing House.


 

 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 112                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

 

Overview

The teaching of chemistry in the B. Ed. Programme, for the prospective secondary school science teachers must have an integration between theory and practical work. The curriculum should provide them with meaningful and purposeful training and experiences so that they develop a scientific attitude needed in a science teacher. Since the nature of science is not only content but process, so the student science teachers must acquire competency in skills like observation, classifying, communicating, predicting, inferring, measuring, experimenting, before transacting the same to their students. The curriculum needs to be progressive and forward looking so the prospective teachers must be trained how to use Information and Educational Technology effectively. Intensive teacher training is required with a wider vision to develop the teaching skills, understanding the nature of the discipline and to make the teachers resourceful in approach.

 

Objectives

 

1.       To acquire the understanding of the various concepts, facts, terms and developments in the field of science education.

2.       To critically analyse the curriculum/evaluation process/methodology of teaching in school to bring about changes in future.

3.       To apply the understanding in a teaching learning process in schools.

4.       To develop teaching skills for conducting theory and practical lessons.

5.       To enable the students to use audio-visual aids and information technology for effective teaching.

6.       To develop the abilities for planning and organising a chemistry laboratory.

 

Course Content

 

Unit I  Nature of significance of teaching chemistry

Ø       Meaning nature and scope of chemistry

Ø       Significance of chemistry in daily life

 

Unit II  Aims and objectives of teaching chemistry

Ø       Meaning and need of objective based teaching

Ø       General aims of teaching chemistry at senior secondary level

Ø       Classification of educational objectives with reference to Bloom’s taxonomy

Ø       Writing specific objectives in behavioral form in chemistry

 

Unit III  Planning a lesson

Ø       Unit Planning

Ø       Lesson Planning

Ø       Theory Lesson plan

Ø       Practical Lesson plan

 

 

 

 

Unit IV Instructional Strategies

 

-          Lecture – Demonstration Method

-          Demonstration Method

-          Lecture Method

-          Laboratory Method

-          Heuristic Method

-          Problem Solving Method

-          Project Method

-          Scientific Method

-          Individualized Instruction Method

 

Unit V  Role of Information Technology and Audio Visual Aids

Ø       Use of Audio Visual aids with emphasis on demonstrations in Chemistry.

Ø       Computer assisted learning in Chemistry.

 

Unit VI  Curriculum

Ø       Place of Chemistry in School Curriculum

Ø       Chemistry as a component of Integrated Science at Secondary Level

Ø       Principle of constructing a chemistry curriculum

Ø       Textbooks in chemistry, its need and use, evaluation of textbooks in chemistry

 

Unit VII  Evaluation

Ø       Concept of evaluation

Ø       Preparation and administration of an achievement test in Chemistry.

Ø       Criteria of a good achievement test.

Ø       Study of examination system in chemistry.

 

Unit VIII  The Professional Growth of a Chemistry Teacher

Ø       Competencies associated with laboratory techniques

Ø       Organisation of science clubs, fairs and excursions.

 

Practical Work:

1.      Conducting a practical class with preparation of a practical lesson plan.

2.      Organising and conducting demonstrations in the classrooms.

3.      Organising a chemistry laboratory.

4.      Construction of a linear/branched programme for a particular standard.

5.      Preparation of a unit plan.

6.      Organising a field trip related to co-curricular activities in chemistry.

 

References

1.       Newbury, N. F. (1965), The Teaching of Chemistry,  3rd Edition, London: Heinemann Education Books Ltd..

2.       Jerry Wellington (1996), Secondary Science Contemporary Issues and Practical Approaches, Routledge London and New York.

3.       Waddington, D. J. (1984), Teaching of School Chemistry, UNESCO.

4.       Sonders, H. N. (1971), Science Teaching in Senior Secondary Schools, Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.

5.       T. N. Ratho & Ravi Prakash (1996), Emerging Trends in Teaching of Chemistry, Kanishka Publishers.

 

 

 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 113                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Course overview

 

This course is designed for the prospective secondary school teachers. The course would include developing competencies in secondary level mathematics curriculum, their appropriate instructional strategies, using visual aids, etc.

 

Objectives:

 

The course will try to develop among the prospective secondary school teachers:

 

-          Understanding of nature of mathematics

-          Understanding of historical developments leading to concepts in modern mathematics.

-          Understanding of learning theories and their applications in mathematics education.

-          Improve their competencies in secondary level mathematics.

-          Understanding various instructional strategies and their appropriate use in teaching mathematics at the secondary level.

-          Understanding preparation and use of diagnostic test and organise remedial teaching.

-          Application of appropriate evaluation techniques in mathematics

 

Course Content

 

1.      Introduction to mathematics education

-          Nature of mathematics (axioms, postulates, patterns and language of Mathematics)

-          Values of teaching mathematics

-          Aims and objectives of teaching Mathematics

-          Integration of Mathematics with other subjects

 

2.      Historical developments in mathematics

-          Historical development of Notations and Number systems

-          Contributions of Indian Mathematicians (Ramanujan, Aryabhatta, Bhaskaracharya)

 

3.      Place of mathematics in secondary school curriculum

 

-          Principles of curriculum construction

-          Critical evaluation of the curriculum in use in Mathematics at the secondary stage.

-          Qualities of a good Mathematics textbook and its evaluation.

4.      Instructional strategies in teaching mathematics

-          Inductive, deductive approach

-          Analytic and synthetic approach

-          Heuristic and project approach

-          Graded assignments in Mathematics

-          Problem solving

 

5.      Organization of teaching mathematics and their related problems

-          Developing objectives of teaching mathematics in behavioural terms (Bloom’s taxonomy)

-          Preparation of lesson plan

-          Selecting appropriate instructional strategies related to various topics included in secondary classes of the CBSE in the following areas:

-          Teaching of Arithmetic (Commercial Maths)

-          Teaching of Algebra (sets, relation, functions and algebraic identities)

-          Teaching of Geometry (Congruent and Similar triangles)

-          Teaching of Trigonometry (t-ratios, Heights and Distances)

-          Teaching of Statistics (Measures of Central Tendency)

-          Teaching of Mensuration (Surface areas and volumes of solid figures)

-          Mathematics clubs.

 

 

 

6.      Diagnostic test and remedial teaching in Mathematics

-          Nature and constructions of diagnostic test

-          Error analysis

-          Different models of lesson planning

-          Annual, term, unit lesson planning

-          Criticism of lessons being observed

 

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF LIFE SCIENCE

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 114                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

Objectives: The main objectives of teaching of Life Sciences at ‘O’ level is to enable the student-teacher to:

 

·         understand the nature of life science

·         understand why and how life sciences are to be taught

·         enrich some important themes related to secondary stage of school curriculum in the area of life sciences

·         understand some basic principles and types of life-science curriculum

·         understand basic approaches and methods of teaching of life-sciences at secondary level.

·         understand techniques of evaluation for determining the students performance.

·         Acquire the professional competencies essential for a life-science teacher.

 

 

Course Content

 

Unit I -  Nature and Significance of Teaching Life Science

·        Meaning, nature and scope of life science

·        Application and significance of life science

·        Life science as an integrated area of study.

 

Unit II -  Objectives of Teaching of Life Science

Aims of teaching life science at secondary stage –  instructional objectives of teaching life science – objectives at cognitive, affective and psychomotor tools – formulation of specific objectives in behavioural terms.

 

 

Unit III -  Life Science Curriculum at Secondary Stage

·        Principles and approaches of curriculum construction at secondary level.

·        Evaluation of a life science curriculum at senior secondary stage.

 

Unit IV -  Textbooks of Biological Science.

·        Textbooks, laboratory manual and reference material in Biology and their use

·        Study of nationalized textbooks

·        Importance of curriculum guides

 

Unit V -  Instructional Planning in Life Science

·        Course planning – preparation of an annual plan with time utilization

·        Unit planning

·        Lesson planning

 

 

 

 

 

Unit VI - Methods and Media Approaches

Lecture method Lecture-cum-demonstration, laboratory method, problem solving/investigatory method, guided inquiry, project methods, self-learning methods, electronic media such as AV programmes, etc.

 

Unit VII - Activities

Techniques and skills in collection, preservation, display and maintenance of the following – Herbarium, Aquarium, Terrarium, Vivarium, Dried specimens, Dry and wet specimens, Student Laboratory Squad or kit improvisation.

 

 

Unit VIII – Evaluation

·        Preparation and administration of an achievement test in Life Science

·        Evaluation of laboratory work, observation schedules, rating scales and check lists.

·        Remedial Teaching.

 

 

Unit IX - Professional Competencies of Life Science Teacher

 Competencies associated with laboratory techniques.  Organising life science clubs, fairs and excursions.

 

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.       Bremmer, Jean (1967), Teaching Biology, London: Macmillan.

2.       Heller, R. (1967), New Trends in Biology Teaching, Peris: UNESCO

3.       NCERT (1969), Improving Instructions in Biology, New Delhi.

4.       Novak, J.D. (1970), The Improvement of Biology Teaching Modern Science Teaching, Delhi: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

5.       Sharma, R. C. (1975), Modern Science Teaching, Delhi: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

6.       Waston, N. S.  (1967), Teaching Science Creativity in Secondary School, London: U.B. Saunders Company.

 

Further Readings

 

1.       Green, T. C. (1967), The Teaching and Learning Biology, London, Allman & Sons.

2.       Miller, David, F. (1963), Methods and Materials for Teaching the Biological Sciences, New York: McGraw Hill.

3.       Nunn, Gordon (1951), Handbook for science Teachers in secondary Modern Schools, London: John Murry.

4.       Thurber, Walter (1964), Teaching of Science in Toda’s Secondary Schools, New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

5.       Vaidya, N. (1971), The Impact of Science Teaching, New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publication Co.

6.       Voss, Burton F. A. and Bren, S. B., Biology as Inquiry: A Book of Teaching Methods.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF HISTORY

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 115                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Content

 

1.      MEANING, NATURE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF HISTORY

(i)                  Meaning and nature of History

(ii)                The place of history in secondary school curriculum

(iii)               Curriculum development in History

 

 

2.      OBJECTIVE BASED TEACHING OF HISTORY

(i)                  Aims and objectives of teaching with particular reference to Indian History.

(ii)                Types of objectives

(iii)               Statement of objectives in behavioural terms.

 

3.      LEARNER CENTRED AND ACTIVITY BASED APPROACH

(i)                  Teaching of history through monuments

(ii)                Discussion method

(iii)               Question answer method

(iv)              Source method

(v)                Symposium

(vi)              Role play

 

4.      PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SUBJECT

(i)                  Identification of concepts from a unit/chapter

(ii)                Pedagogical analysis of a unit/chapter

(iii)               Listing behavioural outcomes

 

5.      TRANSACTIONAL STRATEGIES

(i)                  Preparation of a lesson plan

(ii)                Preparation of theme based plan

 

6.      TEACHING AIDS AND CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES/ACTIVITIES IN HISTORY

(i)                  Text Book

(ii)                Low cost teaching aids

(iii)               Maps

(iv)              Site visits

(v)                Radio, films and television

 

 

 

7.      INTEGRATION OF HISTORY WITH OTHER SUBJECTS

8.      EVALUATION IN HISTORY

(i)                  Comprehensive and continuous evaluation

(ii)                Evaluation devices: written, open book examination, oral, observation, record.

(iii)               Preparation of achievement test.

(iv)              Remedial Teaching

 

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

1.       Chaudhary, K. P. (1975), The Effective Teaching of History in India, New Delhi: NCERT.

2.       Dhanija Neelam (1993), Multimedia Approaches in Teaching Social Studies, New Delhi, Harman Publishing Hosue.

3.       Dixit , U. and Bughela (1972), Itihas shikshan, Jaipur: Hindi Ganth Academy.

4.       Ghate, V. D. (1956), Teaching of History (English & Hindi), Bombay: Oxford University Press.

5.       Khan S.U. (1998), History Teaching-Problems, Prospective and Prospect, New Delhi: Heera.

 

Further Readings

1.       Burton, W.H. (1972), Principles of History Teaching, London: Methuen.

2.       Gunning, Dennis (1978), The Teaching of History, London: Goom Helm Ltd.

3.       Jarvis, C. H., Teaching of History.

4.       Kochar, S. K. (1972), The Teaching of History, Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

5.       Lewis, E.M. (1960), Teaching History in Secondary Schools, Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

6.       Mujeeb, M. (1960), World History: Our Heritage, Bombay: Asia Publishers

7.       Shaida, B. D. and Singh, S. (1973), Teaching of History, Jullendur: Dhanpat Rai & Sons.

8.       Tara Chand, A History of Indian People, Aligarh: P.C. Dwadesh & Co.

9.       Weech, S.K.I. (1951), History of the World London: Odhas Press Ltd.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 116                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

1.       Nature of political science, its needs & significance.

 

 

2.       OBJECTIVE BASED TEACHING

Its concept. Objectives of teaching political science, product-process objectives, Long term – short term objectives. Knowledge, skills and value based objectives. Identifying and stating objectives in terms of content and behaviour outcomes in learning.

 

3.       LEARNER CENTRED AND ACTIVITY BASED TEACHING

Development of thinking and concept formation, analysis of political proceses and events, Mass-media and scrap book approaches to teaching specially current events, investigations and projects in political science.

 

4.       CURRICULUM AND TEXTBOOKS

5.       PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Classroom interactions, heuristic, discussion, problem solving, role playing, lecture and question-answer, curriculum development and text book evaluation as used in schools.

 

6.       TRANSACTIONAL STRATEGIES

(i)                   Preparation of lesson Plan.

(ii)                 Unit plan on a topic from above given areas of enrichment content by stating objectives, developing concepts and contents involved and planning classroom interaction activities of the teacher and the pupils

(iii)                Maintaining the ecology of the classroom.

 

7.       TEACHING AIDS AND CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

(i)                   Text book

(ii)                 Low cost improvised teaching aids

(iii)                Bulletin board

(iv)                Radio, films and television

(v)                  Visits and field studies

 

8.       EVALUATION IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

(i)                   Comprehensive and continuous evaluation

(ii)                 Norm reference and criterion reference tests

(iii)                Evaluation devices – written, open book examination, oral, observation, record.

(iv)                Preparation of a unit tests

(v)                  Preparation of an achievement test

(vi)                Remedial Teachings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

1.       Aggarwal, N. N., et. al. (1978), Principles of Political Science, 6th  Edition. New Delhi: Ram Chand & Co.

2.       Ambrose, A. and Mial, A. (1968), Children’s Social Learning, New York: Association for supervision and Curriculum Development.

3.       Apter, David, E. (1978),  Introduction to Political Analysis, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

4.       Bining, A.C. (1952), Teaching of Social Studies in Sec. School, New York: McGraw Hill.

5.       Burner, Jerome, S. (1971), Towards a Theory of Instruction, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

6.       Dhanija Neelam (1993), Multimedia Approaches in Teaching Social Studies, New Delhi: Harmen Publishing House.

7.       Kochhar, S. K. (1963), The Teaching of Social Studies, Delhi: University Publishers.

8.       Wesley, F. B. (1950), Teaching social Studies in High School, Boston: D.C., Health & Co.

 

FURTHER READINGS

1.       Buch, M. B. (1969), Improving Instruction in Civics, New Delhi: NCERT.

2.       Fenton, Edwin (1967), The New Social Studies, New York: Hlot Rinehart & Winston, Inc.

3.       Finer, (1953), Teaching Techniques in Social Studies, New York: Bank Street Publication.

4.       Gleeson Denis & Whitty Geoff (1976), Developments in Social Studies Teaching, London: Open Book.

5.       Nicholson & Write, Social Studies for Future Citizen, Geoirge Harrap.

6.       Verma, S. P. (1975), Modern Political Theory, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

7.       White, F.M. ,Teaching of Modern Civics, Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF ECONOMICS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 117                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To acquire competence in the content prescribed by CBSE for Senior Secondary level.

·        To acquire competence in various strategies, methods, techniques and skills of teaching Economics at the senior secondary level.

·        To acquire competence in relating of appropriate strategy to the content to be taught.

·        To inculcate spirit of experimentation for finding out effectiveness of alternative strategies of teaching.

·        To promote reflection on issues pertaining to teaching of Economics.

·        To develop competence in designing effective instructional strategies to teach Economics.

·        To develop ability to design, develop and use various tools & techniques of evaluation.

 

Course Content

 

I.                    Aims and objectives of teaching Economics at secondary level. Specification of content for realisation of objectives. Integration of Economics with other School subjects.

II.                  Teaching of Concepts in Economics

Concept: meaning, characteristic and classification – analysis of the concept, essential attributes of a strategy of teaching to teach concepts.

 

III.                Methods of Teaching

 

Expository Based        :           Lecture, debate, discussion, story telling method

Discovery Based        :           Experimental/inquiry/problem solving

Activity Based             :           Simulation/gaming, survey method, source method, case  

                                               study, project method.

Individualized

Instructive Based        :           Computer assisted instruction, modular, mastery 

learning, Dalton plan

Group Dynamics Based :            Seminars, conference, panel discussion, symposium.

Others                          :           Unit method.

Assignments                 :           Principles of giving assignments, types of assignments,

techniques of framing assignments.

IV.                Teaching Aids

Importance of teaching aids, different types of teaching aids and their effective use in teaching of Economics.

 

 

V.                  Co-Curricular activities

-          Role of co-curricular activities.

-          The development of scholistic & non-scholastic activities

 

 

VI.                Evaluation

Nature of educational evaluation, its need, role in educational process. Evaluation procedure for appraising learners performance, uses of evaluation. Behavioural approach to testing instructional objectives in Economics. Planning & preparation of unit test and achievement test. Openbook examination, evaluating project work, question bank. Remedial Teaching.

 

 

Suggested Readings

a)      Related to Teaching of Economics

-          Arora, P. N. (1985), Evaluation in Economics, New Delhi: NCERT,.

-          Arora, P.N. and Shorie, J.P. (1986), Open Book Examination Question in Economics, New Delhi: NCERT.

-          Assistant Masters Association (1974), The Teaching of Secondary School Economics, London: Cambridge University Press.

-          Chakravorty, S. (1987), Teaching of Economics in India, Bombay: Himalya Publishing.

-          Hicks, J.R. (1960), The Social Framework – An Introduction to Economics, London: Oxford University Press.

-          Hodkinson, Steve ,Whitehead, and David J. (ed) (1986), Economics Education: Research and Development Issues, London, New York: Longman.

-          Kanwar, B. S. (1973), Teaching of Economics, Ludhiana: Prakash Brothers.

-          Khan, R. S.,  Teaching Economics (In Hindi), Kota Open University, BE-13.

-          Lee, N. (ed) (1975), Teaching Economics, London: Heinemann Educational Books, Prentice Hall.

-          NCERT (1974), Teaching Units in Economics for High and Higher Secondary Stage, New Delhi.

-          Oliver, J. M. (1977), The Principles of Teaching Economics within the Curriculum, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

-          Sachs, I. (ed.) (1971), Main trends in Economics, Projects and Role Playing in Economics, London: MacMillan.

-          Siddiqi, M.H. (1993), Teaching of Economics, New Delhi: Ashish Publishing House.

-          Srivastava, H. S. (1976), Unit Tests in Economics, New Delhi: NCERT.

-          Tyagi, S. D. (1973), Teaching of Economics (In Hindi), Agra: Vinod Pustak Bhandar.

-          Whitehead, D. J. (ed.) (1974), Curriculum Development in Economics, London: Heinemann Education Books.

-          Whitehead, D. J. (ed.) (1979), Handbook for Economics Teachers, London: Heinemann Education Books.

 

 

b)      Related to General Methods of Teaching

 

-          Bining A. C. and Bining, D. H. (1952). Teaching the Social Studies in Secondary Schools, New York: McGraw Hill Book Company.

-          Bloom, B.S., et. al. (ed) (1956), Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Pt. I-Cognitive Domain, Pt. II Affective Domain, New York: David McKay.

-          Bossing, N.L. (1970), Teaching in Secondary School. New Delhi: Amerind Publishing Co.

-          Callahan, J. F. and Clark, L.H. (1982),Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools, New York: MacMillan Publishing Co.

-          Directorate of Extension Programme for Secondary Education (1960), The Concept of Evaluation in Education.

-          Jain A. C. (1973), Teaching Social Studies (In Hindi), Jaipur: Rajasthan Hindi Granth Academy.

-          UNESCO (1981), Handbook for Teaching Social Studies, Paris: UNESCO.

-          Wesley, E. B. (1950), Teaching Social Studies in High School, Boston: D. C. Heath & Co..

 

Reports/Documents

-          The Curriculum for the Ten Year School – A Framework, NCERT, New Delhi, 1975.

-          Guidelines and Syllabus for Secondary Stage (Class IX & X), NCERT, New Delhi, 1988.

-          Learning to Do: Report of the National Review Committee on Higher Secondary Education with Special Reference to Vocationalization, Ministry of Education and Social Welfare, New Delhi, 1978.

-          National Policy on Education – 1986, MHRD, New Delhi, 1986.

-          Programme of Action – 1992, MHRD, New Delhi, 1992.

-          Report of an Adhoc Committee of the Economics Association: The Contribution of Economics to General Education. London, 1977.

-          Report of the Review Committee on the Curriculum for the Ten Year School, Ministry of Education & Social Welfare, New Delhi, 1977.

-          Report of the Seminar on Teaching of Economics, RBS College of Education, Agra, 1973.

 

Newspapers/TV

-          Business Bulletin, DD Metro, 7.45 a.m. (Daily)

-          Business Times in The Times of India (Daily)

-          Economy and Business in The Hindustan Times (Daily).

-          The Economic Times (Daily)

-          The Financial Express (Daily)

 

Journals/Magazines

 

-          Economic and Political Weekly

-          YOJANA, Government of India, Publications Division.

-          The Business

-          India, Government of India, Publications Division.

Others

(i)                   Bawa, M. S. (ed.) (1995), Tendering of Economics: Contemporary Methods and Strategies for Secondary and Senior Secondary levels, IASE, Deptt. of Education, Delhi University.

(ii)               Bawa, M. S. (ed.) (1996), Evaluation in Economics, IASE, Deptt. of Education, Delhi University.

(iii)             Bawa M. S. (ed.) (1998), Source Book on Strategies of Teaching Social Sciences, IASE, Deptt. of Education, Delhi University.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 118                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

 

1.      NATURE AND SCOPE OF MODERN GEOGRAPHY

(i)                               Geography as a study of spatial differentiation

(ii)                             Geography as a study of spatial relationship

(iii)                            Geography as a study of spatial organisation

 

 

2.      AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF TEACHING GEOGRAPHY IN SCHOOLS

(i)                   Type of objectives

(ii)                 Writing specific objectives of geography teaching in behavioural terms.

 

3.      LEARNER CENTRED AND ACTIVITY BASED APPROACH

(i)                   Conceptual learning in Geography

-          Spatial conceptualisation – use of cognitive/mental maps

-          Perception and geography learning

 

(ii)                 Approaches in Geography teaching

         Expository approach, Story telling and regional method

         Discovery approach

         Problem solving approach

         Project method

(iii)                Individualised instruction

 

4.      PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF GEOGRAPHY

(i)                   Pedagogical analysis of a few units from enrichment content

(ii)                 Identification and classification of concepts from the above mentioned unit

(iii)                Development of map reading skills

 

5.      CURRICULUM PLANNING IN GEOGRAPHY

(i)                   Criteria used in the formulation of geography curriculum

(ii)                 Guidelines for course construction

(iii)                Geography text book and its evaluation

 

6.      TRANSACTIONAL STRATEGIES

(i)                   Preparation of lesson plans

(ii)                 Preparation of unit plans

(iii)                Maintaining harmony of the classroom, individual difference, group and individual learning.

(iv)                Teaching aids and designing a geography laboratory

 

7.      CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN GEOGRAPHY

(i)                   Excursion

(ii)                 Bulletin board

(iii)                Geography club

(iv)                Geography exhibition

(v)                  Use of community resources

 

 

8.      EVALUATION

(i)                   Comprehensive and continuous evaluation

(ii)                 Developments of test items, essay, short answers objective types.

(iii)                Diagnostic testing and remedial measurement

(iv)                Preparation of one diagnostic test.

(v)                  Preparation of achievement test and analysis and interpretation of test data.

(vi)                Remedial Teaching.

 

 

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

 

1.       Arrora K. K. (1976), The Teaching of Geography, Jalandhar: Prakash Brothers.

2.       Broadman, David (1985), New Directions in Geography Education, London: philadelphia, Fehur Press.

3.       Chorely R. J. (1970), Frontiers in Geography Teaching, London: Mathews and Co. Ltd.

4.       Dhanija Neelam (1993), Multimedia Approaches in Teaching Social Studies, New Delhi: Harmen Publishing House.

5.       Graves N. G. (1982), New Source Book for Geography Teaching, London: Longman the UNESCO press.

6.       Hall David (1976), Geography and Geography Teacher, London: Unwin Eduation Books.

7.       Huckle J. (1983), Geographicla Education Reflection and Acion, London: Oxford University Press.

8.       Leong, Goh Chey (1976), Certificate of Human and Physical Geography,  Singapur: Oxford University Press.

9.       Morrey D.C. (1972), Basic Geography, London: Hien Manns Education Book Ltd.

10.   Mohd. Z.U. Alvi (1984), Tadrees Jugrafia, Taraqqui Urdu Board

11.   UNESCO, New Source Book for Teaching of Geography.

12.   Verma J.P. (1960), Bhugol Adhyhan, Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.

13.   Verma O. P. (1984), Geography Teaching, New Delhi: Sterling Publication Pub. Ltd.

14.   Walford Rex (1981), Signposts for Geography Teaching, London: Longman.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF BUSINESS STUDIES

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 119                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

This course has been developed to familiarise the student-teachers of B. Ed. with the pedagogy of teaching Business Studies being taught at +2 level.

 

The Expected outcomes

After completing this course, student-teachers will be able to:

 

·         develop an awareness why business studies is taught at +2 level.

·         familiarise the student-teachers with the technique of developing curriculum for the +2 students of Business Studies

·         develop an analytical ability to appraise the existing curriculum of commerce meant for +2 students.

·         familiarise the student-teachers with the nature of business studies being taught at the school level.

·         enable them to be conversant with the different methods of teaching meant for teaching +2 students.

·         enable them to identify and use content-based methods of teaching.

·         develop positive outlook and skill for the use of modern teaching-aids.

·         instill the competence of organising co-curricular activities for enriching the subject matter of business studies.

·         develop the ability of exploring good books and other study-material in business studies.

·         enable them to develop the tools and techniques of evaluation for appraising and enhancing students’ knowledge in business studies.

 

Course Contents

 

Unit I               Nature and Need of Business Studies

             

Nature of business studies, its scope, its delimitation at the school level, justification of its introduction at school level, its place in the school curriculum.

 

Unit II              Curriculum of Business Studies

 

                        Concepts of curriculum and syllabus, developing curriculum of business studies at +2 level, a critical appraisal of present syllabi developed by CBSE.

 

Unit III             Objectives of Teaching Business Studies

 

                        Nature of general and specific objectives, behavioural objectives, technique of writing objectives – instructional and behavioural using Mager’s approach.

 

Unit IV             Teaching Aids

 

                        Importance of teaching aids, types of teaching-aids, scope of using teaching-aids for the teaching of business studies.

 

 

 

 

Unit V              Methods and Techniques of Teaching Business Studies

 

(a)     Lecture method

(b)     Question-answers technique

(c)     Discussion method

(d)     Project method

(e)     Problem-solving method

(f)       Teaching through games

 

Unit VI             Co-curricular activities

 

Business studies based co-curricular activities and their utility, linkage of school and outside organisations for strengthening business studies knowledge.

 

Unit VII            Integration of Business Studies with other subjects

Accountancy, Political Science, Geography, Psychology, Philosophy, Statistics, Ethics and Sociology.

 

Unit VII            Text books and Other Instructional Material in Business Studies

 

                        Selection of text-books, reference books and journals

 

Unit VIII           Evaluation

 

Concepts of evaluation, measurement and tests, types of tests, developing different types of tests in business studies. Remedial Teaching. Preparing an Achievement Test, Types of test items.

 

 

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.       Bhatia, S. K. (1979), Teaching of Principles of Commerce and Accountancy, SIE Publication, Delhi.

2.       Calfrey C. Alhonn, (1988), Managing the Learning Process in Business Education, Colonial Press, USA

3.       Musselman, Vernon, A., and Musselman, Donald Lee, (1975), Methods in Teaching Basic Business Subjects, 3rd ed. Danniel, III. The Interstate Printers and Publishers.

4.       Nolan, C. A. (1968), Principles and Problems of Business Education, Cincinnati, South Western Publishing Company.

5.       Schrag & Poland (1987), A System for Teaching Business Education, McGraw Hill Book Company, New York.

6.       Siddique, M. Akhtar and R. S. Khan, (1995), Handbook for Business Studies Teachers, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi.

7.       Tonne, Herbhert and Lovis C. Nancy, (1995), Principles of Business Education, McGraw Hill, New York.

8.       Megary, J., (1989), Simulation and Gaming, The International Encyclopedia of Educational Technology, Oxford Pergamon Press.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

TEACHING OF ACCOUNTANCY

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 120                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

This course has been developed to familiarize the student-teachers of B. Ed. with the pedagogy of teaching accountancy being taught at +2 level.

 

The Expected Outcomes

After completing this course, student-teachers will be able to:

 

i)                     acquaint themselves with the nature of accountancy being taught at +2 level

ii)                   justify the  rationale of including this course in the school curriculum

iii)                  rationalise the introduction of this course at +2 level

iv)                  enumerate the general and specific objectives of teaching accountancy at +2 level

v)                    develop the technique of writing instructional objectives of teaching various topics of accounting

vi)                  familiarise themselves with the technique of developing accounting curriculum for the +2 students

vii)                 appraise the +2 accounting curriculum developed by CBSE

viii)               have an insight into the details of the various approaches and methods of teaching accountancy

ix)                 utilise the different teaching aids for effective transaction of the contents of accounting

x)                   rationalise the organisation of co-curricular activities for strengthening the knowledge of accounting

xi)                 make use of work-books and practice sets for gaining practical knowledge of the world of accounting

xii)                equip themselves with the essential qualities of an ideal accounting teacher, and

xiii)              familarise themselves with the techniques of evaluation in accounting.

 

Course Contents

 

Unit I :              Nature and Need of Accounting

Nature of accounting, rationale of its inclusion in the school curriculum justification of its introduction at 10+2 stage.

 

Unit II:              Development of Accounting Curriculum

Technique of developing accounting curriculum, a critical appraisal of the CBSE accounting syllabus.

 

Unit III:             Objectives of Teaching Accounting

General and specific objectives of teaching accounting, domains of writing specific objectives, techniques of writing objectives (Mager’s approach)

 

Unit IV:             Teaching Aids

Use of softwares and hardwares for the teaching of accountancy, including the use of computers.

 

Unit V:              Methods and Techniques of Teaching Accounting

(a)     Lecture method

(b)     Question-answer technique

(c)     Problem solving method

(d)     Games method

(e)     Project method

 

Unit VI:             Co-Curricular Activities

Different types of co-curricular activities for strengthening the learning of accounting.

 

Unit VII:            Integration of Accountancy with other subjects

                        Business studies, Mathematics, Statistics, Ethics, Philosophy and History.

 

Unit VIII:           Approaches to Teaching Accounting Cycle

Concept of accounting cycle, completing accounting cycle through the following approaches:

 

(a)     Journal approach

(b)     Equation approach

(c)     Voucher approach

 

Comparative study of these approaches.

 

Unit IX:             Practical Accounting Knowledge

                        Workbooks, practice sets

 

Unit X:              Accounting Teacher

Qualities of an ideal accounting teacher, avenues available for professional growth.

 

Unit XI:             Evaluation in Accounting

Techniques of correcting students’ written work, assignments and giving feedback types of tests in accounting. Remedial Teaching.

 

 

Suggested Reading

 

1.       Bhatia, S. K., (1996), Methods of Teaching Accountancy, Publication No. 16, CIE, Delhi.

2.       Binnion, John E., (1956), When you use a Book-Keeping Practice Set, Journal of Business Education. Vol. 32 Oct.,  pp. 30-33.

3.       Boynton, Laewis, D. (1955), Methods of Teaching Book-Keeping, Cincinnati: South Western Publishing Co.

4.       Forkher Handen L., R. M. Swanson and R. J. Thompson, (1960), The Teaching of Book-Keeping, South Western Publishing Co.

5.       Johnson, H. Whittam, A. “A Practical Foundation in Accounting”, U.K., George Allen & Urwin (Publishers) Ltd. 1984.

6.       Maheshwari, S. B. (1969), Teachers’ Guide in Book-Keeping & Accountancy, Monograph 6, NCERT, Regional College of Education, Ajmer.

7.       Musselman, Vernon A and J. M. Hanna (1960), Teaching Book-Keeping and Accounting, New York McGraw Hill Book Co.

8.       Sapre, P.M. (1968), Trends in Teaching Book-Keeping and Accounting”, Regional College of Education, Mysore.

9.       Van Ments, M. (1990), Simulations, Games and Role Play, Handbook of Educational Ideas and practices, London: Routledge.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING OF HOME SCIENCE

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 121                                                          L-4       T/P-0    Credits-4

 

This course is to deal with the entire range of activities associated with the teaching of Home Science at the Higher Secondary level. The emphasis has been on the knowledge, understanding and application of various approaches/methods/strategies associated with teaching of Home Science effectively in the School. The specific course objectives and unit-wise content are given as under:

 

Course Content

The student teacher will be able to:

 

-          Familiarize themselves with the meaning and scope of Home Science and Objectives of Teaching Home Science at Higher Secondary Level.

-          Understand the importance of Teaching Home Science in School.

-          Know and apply various techniques and approaches of Teaching Home Science at Higher Secondary level.

-          Plan instructions effectively for Teaching of Home Science.

-          Evaluate student performance effectively with reliability and validity.

 

Unit 1 Meaning and Scope of Home Science

 

a.       The modern meaning of Home Science and its place in Secondary School

b.       Objectives of Teaching Home Science at Senior Secondary Level.

c.       Status of Home Science

d.       Scope of Home Science in School Curriculum

 

Unit 2 Approaches and Methods of Teaching Home Science

 

a.      Discussion method

b.      Demonstration method

c.      Laboratory work

d.      Project method

e.      Problem solving method

f.        Field trips

g.      Micro teaching

h.      Computer as tool for instruction

i.         Market survey

j.         Assignment method

k.       Use of community resources

l.         Exhibition and displays

 

Unit 3 Planning and Designing for Effective Instruction in Home Science

a.      Planning for instructional process – need, advantages and strategies

b.      Lesson planning – design, approaches & writing lesson plan

c.      Audio visual aids in teaching of Home Science

d.      Principles of curriculum planning and development of Home Science Syllabus

e.      Characteristics of a good a Home Science

f.        Use and Management of Home Science Laboratory


Unit 4 Correlation of Home Science with other subjects

 

a.      Correlation of Home Science with other subjects and School activities

b.       SUPW related to Home Science

 

Unit 5 Illustrations of Teaching Learning Process in Home Science

 

a.      Teaching of Human Development

b.      Teaching of Foods and Nutrition

c.      Teaching of Textiles and Clothing

d.      Teaching Community Resource Management and Extension

 

Unit 6 Evaluation in Home Science

 

a.      Evaluation and assessment

b.      Techniques for assessment in theory and practicals

c.      Monitoring learner’s progress

d.      Diagnostic and remedial measures in Home Science

e.      Unit test preparation

 

Unit 7 Practical Oriented Assignments

 

a.      Planning and Organization of Science Laboratory

b.      Development of TV and Radio Lesson

c.      Development of Computer assisted lesson in Home Science

d.      Co-curricular activities in Home Science

 

Suggested Readings

 

1.      Bloom, Benjamin, (Ed.) and others (1965) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals, Handbook 1: Cognitive Domain, New York, David McKay Company Inc.

2.      Broudy, Harry S. and Palmer, John R. (1966) Examples of Teaching Method, Chicago, Second Printing, Chicago, Rand McNally & Co.

3.      Chandra Arvinda (1995) Fundamentals of Teaching Home Science, New Delhi Sterling publishers.

4.      Dale Edgar (1962), Audio Visual Methods in Teaching, revised edition, Hold, Rivehart and Winston, New York.

5.      Das, R. R. and Ray Binita (1989) Teaching of Home Science, New Delhi Sterling Publishers.

6.      Devdas R. P. (1976), Teaching Home Science,  All India Council for Teaching Science.

7.      Hall and Paolucci (1968), Teaching Home Economics, New York Wiley Easten Private Ltd.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 135                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

The Indian Constitution under Article 45 categorically made provision of free and compulsory education to all the children upto the age of 14 years which has not been achieved even after more than 50 years. National Policy on Education (1986) too envisaged certain thrust areas for achieving the goal of UEE, putting special reference to ECCE, Education of the weaker section, disadvantaged group and especially of the girl child. Many initiative in this direction have been taken such as BPEP, UP Primary Education Project, DPEP, NEEM, Lok Jumpish etc. But still there is much need to be done both at the level of planning and its implementation through making Elementary Education as an emerging need.

 

Objectives to develop, understanding about the need of elementary education:

 

-         To enable the prospective teachers to identify the problems and issues associated with the Elementary Education;

-         Enable the prospective teachers to develop the appropriate strategies for universal retention, access and quality at Elementary Education level;

-         To develop among them the capacity to find out solution to the problems associated with the Elementary Education;

-         Enable the prospective teachers to mobilize and utilize community resources as educational inputs;

-         To establish mutually supported linkage amongst the different level at Community – Block – District.

 

Unit – I                      

-         Elementary Education in India – Scope, Coverage, Issues and its present status

-         Constitutional Provisions for Universalisation of Elementary Education – Panchayati Raj.

-         Expansion of Elementary Education under various Five Year Plans.

-         National Policy on Education – 1986.

-         ECCE – its need and significance – Primary Education, Education of Girl Child and deprived group.

 

Unit – II

-         Micro Planning in Education

-         Institutional Planning.

-         Educational Planning at the District Level.

-         Curriculum at Elementary Level – its transaction.

 


Unit – III

-         Meaning and significance of Minimum Level of Learning (MLL).

-         Child Centered Teaching Learning Process.

-         Multi Grade and Multi Level Teaching Learning Process.

-         Programme of Mass Orientation of School Teachers (PMOST).

-         Operation Black Board (OB).

-         Special Orientation Programme of School Teachers (SOPT).

-         District Primary Education Programme (DPEP) concept.

-         Strategies for Universal Access, Universal Relation and Universal Quality of Elementary Education.

-         Education for All (EFA).

-         Role of Non-governmental organisations towards Universalisation of Elementary Education.

-         Alternative Schooling.

 

Unit – IV

-         District Institute of Education and Training – concept, functions and role as a pace-setter for UEE.

-         Pre-Service Teacher Education in DIET for adult and non-formal education.

-         Role of SCERTs in promotion of UEE.

 

 

References:

 

1.      Syed Nurullah & J. P. Naik, ‘History of Education in India – During British Period, Bombay, McMillan & Co. Ltd., 1943.

2.      J. C. Aggarwal & S. P. Aggarwal, ‘Educational Planning in India,’  Vol. I, New Delhi, Concept Publishing Co., 1992.

3.      Sadler J. E. ‘Concept in Primary Education, New York, Oxford University Press, 1985.

4.      Education for All, The Indian Scene, New Delhi, Deptt. Of Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Govt. of India, 1993.

5.      Lockheed, M. (ed.) A. M. verspeer & Associates, Iimproving Primary Education in Developing Countries, A World Bank Publication, Oxford University Press, 1991.

6.      National Policy of Education – 1968, 1978, 1986 including programme of Action 1993 for revised National Policy on Education 1992.

 

 

 

 

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

ASSESSMENT, EVALUATION AND REMEDIAL

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 136                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Course Description: This is a course in measurement and evaluation in the field of education for prospective teachers, counsellers, instructional designers, administrator who are going to be engaged in the development and use of educational measures and are preparing for the first degree programme in education.

 

Objectives: The course aimed at:

 

-          An understanding of measurement and evaluation

-          An understanding of behaivoural objectives and its role in teaching-learning process.

-          An understanding of current issues and trends in educational measurement.

-          An understanding of different abilities and their measurement.

-          Ability to develop achievement tests and diagnostic tests.

-          An understanding of various types of tests, their characteristics and uses

-          An understanding of various methods of grading and reporting

-          An understanding of national testing services

-          An understanding of role of computers in evaluation.

 

 

Course Content

 

Unit I                Assessment and Evaluation

-          Meaning of assessment & evaluation

-          Difference among examination, testing, measurement and evaluation

-          Functions and types of evaluation

-          Role of evaluation in teaching-learning process

-          Evaluation and guidance programme

 

 

Unit II               Educational Objectives

-          Educational objectives in cognitive, affective and psycho-motor domains with special reference to Bloom’s Taxonomy.

-          Mastery learning

-          Methods of stating objectives (Merger’s approach)

-          Application of instructional objectives

 

 

Unit III              Tests & Their Construction

 

-          Achievement test, criterion test, diagnostic test

-          Norm referenced and criteria referenced test

-          Advantages and limitations of essay test, objective test, short answer test.

-          Types of test items

-          Steps in the construction of an achievement test

-          Planning, writing, editing and validity

-          Steps in the construction of diagnostic test

 

Unit IV              Grading and Reporting Achievement, Remediation

 

-          Methods of interpreting test results

-          Grade norms, percentile norms, standard scores, profiles, skill analysis, credit point.

-          Use of computers in testing and reporting.

-          National testing services – nature, role in assessing individuals.

-          Remediation and reinforcement mechanism.

 

 

Suggested Readings:                        

 

1.       Anastasi, A. (1988), Psychological Testing,  6th ed. ,New York, MacMillan Inc.

2.       Baker, F. A. (1989), Computer Technology in Test Construction and Processing, in R. L. Linn, (edited book on Educational Measurement.

3.       Bloom, B. S. (1968) and others (1956), Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, New York, David McKay Co. (also Boo II, Book III).

4.       Conoley, J. C. (ed.) (1990), Tenth Mental Measurement Year Book, Lincoln N. F. Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.

5.       Cronbacth, L. J. (1984), Essentials of Psychological Testing, 4th ed. New York: Harper & Row.

6.       Ebel, R. L. and Frisbie, David A. (1991), Essentials of Educational Measurement, New York: Harper & Row.

7.       Ebel, R. L. and Frisbei, David A. (1991), Essentials of Educational Measurement, New Delhi: Pentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.

8.       Freeman, F. S. (1965), Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing, New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishing Co.

9.       Gronlund, N. E. and Linn, R. L. (1990), Measurement and Evaluation Teaching, 6th ed. ,New York: MacMillan Publishing Co.

10.   Hopkins, K. D., and Stanley, J. C. (1981), Educational and Psychological Measurement and Evaluation, Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice Hall.

11.   Linn, R. L. (1989) (ed.), Educational Measurement, New York: MacMillan.

12.   Mager, R. F. (1962), Preparing Instructional Objectives, Palo Alto, CA: Fearon Publishers, Inc.

13.   Mehrens, W.A. and Lehmann, I. J. 1984), Measurement and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, 3rd ed., New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

14.   Messick, S., et. al. (1983), National Assessment of Educational Progress Reconsidered : A New Design for a New Era, (NAEP Report 83-1).

15.   Popham, W. J. (1975), Educational Evaluation, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

16.   Sax, Gilbert (1974), Principles of Educational Measurement and Evaluation, California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

17.   Thorndike, E. L. and Hagen, E. P. (1969), Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology and Education, New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 137                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Objectives: to enable the student-teacher to:

·         Understand the nature, purpose and need for guidance and counselling

·         Understand the role of counsellors, career masters and teachers in organising guidance programmes

·         Understand different technique of guidance

·         Know about the sources of occupational information, their types and modes of dissemination of such information

·         Understand the behaviour problems of students especially of the deprived and the handicapped.

·         Guide students with special needs & extend vocational/occupational guidance.

 

Course Content

 

Unit I –  Understanding Guidance and Counselling

   Nature, purpose and need for guidance and counselling principles and types of guidance and counselling characteristics of an effective counsellor. Group Guidance - Concept, need, significance and principles. Organisation of group-guidance activities.

 

Unit II –   Techniques and Procedures of Guidance

               Standardized and non-standardized techniques and their relative use in collecting information, organization of guidance programmes in schools.

 

Unit III –  Occupational Information

               Collection, types, classification and dissemination of information

 

Unit IV –   Career Development

               Concept, importance and process of career development various theories related to career development; career patterns; career maturity, and vocational career.

 

Unit VI –  Guiding Students With Special Needs

               Behaviour problems of students with special needs, viz. socio-emotional problems of handicapped and deprived groups such as SC, ST and girls. Provision of facilities at governmental and non-governmental level.

 

Suggested Readings

1.       Bengalee, M. (1984), Guidance and Counselling, Bombay: Seth Publishers.

2.       Crow and Crow (1968), Introduction to Guidance, 2nd Ed., New Delhi: Earasia Publishing Co.

3.       Jayaswal, Monica (1968), Guidance and Counselling, Lucknow: Prakashan Kendra.

4.       Dave Indn. (1984), The Basic Essential of Counselling, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

5.       Nugent, Frank A. (1990), An Introduction to Profession of Counselling, Columbus: Merril Publishing Co.

6.       Rao, S. N. (1992), Counselling and Guidance, New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

7.       Mehdi, B. C. (1978), Guidance in Schools, 3rd Ed. New Delhi: NCERT.

8.       Bennet, M. E. (1963), Guidance and Counselling in Groups, New York: McGraw Hill.

9.       Mehta, P.H. and Wadia, K. A. (1972), Handbook for Counsellors, New Delhi: NCERT.

10.   Stefflire, B. (1972), Theories of Counselling, (Ed), New York, McGraw Hill.

11.   Stone, C. H. (1966), Principles of Guidance, New York: Harper and Row.

 

 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 138                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

 

Objectives

 

-          To understand the concept, meaning and significance of special education.

-          To develop awareness about different types of disabilities/handicaps in children.

-          To acquire knowledge and understanding of class-room management for educating children with special problems/disabilities.

-          To develop awareness about different organizations dealing with special education – both governmental and non-governmental.

-          To know about the initiatives and constitutional provisions envisaged to deal with children with special needs for their education and their rehabilitation.

 

 

Unit 1

 

Concept and meaning of special education its aims, aims of Special Education - Educational provisions, recommendations of Education NPE with regard to special education special schools, integrated education for disabled children.

 

Unit 2 Education of Children with Visual Impairment/Disability

 

Definition of blindness and low vision. Identification and assessment. Curriculum and teaching adaptation. Adaptive devices. Adaptation evaluation procedures. Tools and techniques. Class room management, vocational preparation ,and employment opportunities.

 

Unit 3 Education of Children with Hearing Impairment/Disabilities

 

Definition of deafness and partial hearing. Identification and assessment. Curriculum and teaching adaptation. Adaptive devices. Adaptation evaluation procedures. Tools and techniques, class room management, vocational preparation ,and employment opportunities.

 

 

Unit 4 Education of Children with Mental Retardation/Learning Disabilities.

 

Definition of mental retardation. Identification and assessment. Curriculum and teaching adaptation. Adaptation evaluation procedures. Tools and techniques. Class room management, vocational preparation, and employment opportunities.

 

 

Unit 5 Education of Children with Orthopaedic Handicap/Disabilities.

 

Definition of orthopaedic handicap. Identification and assessment. Curriculum and teaching adaptation. Adaptive devices, adaptive evaluation procedures, tools and techniques. Classroom management, vocational preparation and employment opportunities.

 

 

Unit 6 Administration and Organization of Special Education in India

 

Role of Rehabilitation Council of India and NGOs.

 

 

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 139                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Course Objectives: To enable the student – teacher to:

-          understand the concept, role, and features of educational technology

-          to understand various information and communication technologies: strengths and weaknesses of individual technologies

-          to understand how to select and integrate media for effective teaching and learning

-          to understand the basic principles of designing, developing, and utilization of educational technology inputs.

-          to highlight the significance and methodology of evaluation of educational technology

 

Course content

 

Unit 1

-          Educational technology : the concept – difference between technology of education and educational technology

-          An overview of educational technology: nature and role

-          Educational technology and systems approach

-          Educational technology and learning, including skill development and behaviour modification

-          Communication Effective Communication 0 barriers in Communicative

 

Unit 2

-          Information and communication technologies

-          Print media: print and human learning, charts, posters, pictures, play-cards

-          Audio and video media

-          Informatics: computer, graphics, internet

-          Three dimensional models, specimens

-          Selection and integration of media

-          Interactive communication technology

-          Strengths and weakness of individual media

-          Learning from different media

 

Unit 3

-          Development of media inputs/courseware

-          Design considerations

-          Courseware development process: print and non-print

-          Preparation of graphs, charts, OHP transparencies

 

Unit 4

-          Programmed Introduction its meaning, concept & implication

 

Suggested Readings

1.       Kulkarni, S. S. (1986), Introduction to Educational Technology, New Delhi: Oxford-IBH Pub. Co.

2.       Mattoo, B. K., New Teaching Technology for Elementary School Teachers, New Delhi: Federation of Management of Educational Institutions.

3.       Murunalini, T. (1997), Education and Electronic Media, New Delhi: ABH Publishing Corporation.

4.       Sharma, R. A. (2001), Technological Foundations of Education, Meerut: R. Lal Book Depot.

5.       Sharma, R. A. (2000), Shaikshik Prodyogiki, Meerut: R. Lal Book Depot (Hindi).


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

VALUE EDUCATION AND EDUCATION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 140                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

 

Objectives:

 

1)       To enable students to understand the need and importance of value-education and education for Human Rights.

2)       To enable them to understand the nature of values, moral values, moral education and to differentiate such values from religious education, moral training or moral indoctrination

3)       To orient the students with the basis of morality and with the place of reason and emotions in moral development of the child

4)       To enable them to understand the process of moral development vis-à-vis their cognitive and social development

5)       To orient the students with various intervention strategies for moral education and conversion of moral learning to moral education.

 

 

Course Content

 

 

Unit 1 The Socio-Moral and Cultural Context

 

-          Need and importance of value education in the existing social scenario.

-          Valuation of culture: Indian culture and human values spiritual values.

-          Universal Charter of Human Rights – National Human Rights Commission

 

Unit 2 Nature and Concept of Morality and Moral Education

 

-          Moral education vis-à-vis religious education, moral instructions, moral training and moral indoctrination

-          Justice and care – the two dimensions/perspective in morality: dichotomy between reason and passion

-          Moral judgement and moral action

 

Unit 3 Moral Learning to Moral Education

 

-          Moral learning outside the school – child rearing practices and moral learning, moral learning via imitation. Nature of society and moral learning. Media and moral learning

-          Moral  learning inside the school: providing “form” and “content” to moral education.

-          Moral education and the curriculum: can moral education be imparted taking it as a subject of curriculum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 4 Transactional Strategies for Moral Education and Assessment of Moral Maturity

 

-          Models of moral education – a) Rationale building model, b) The consideration model, c) Value classification model, d) Social action model; assessment of moral values.

 

Bibliography

 

1.       Dagar, B. S. (1992), Shiksha Tata Manav Mulya (Hindi), Chandigarh: Haryana Sahitya Academy.

2.       Dagar, B. S. and Dhull Indira (1994), Perspective in Moral Education, New Delhi: Uppal Publishing House.

3.       Mittal, K. K. (ed.) (1976), Quest for Truth, Delhi: Delhi University.

4.       Hirst, P.H. (1974), Moral Education in a Secular Society, London: Hodder and Stroutlon

5.       Piaget, Jean (1948), The Moral Development of Child, 2nd ed., Glencoe Illinois: Free Press.

6.       Scarf Peter (ed.) (1978), Readings in Moral Education, Minnipolis Press Inc.

7.       Newman, Fred (1975), Education for Citizen Action: Challenge for Secondary School Curriculum, Berkeley, Calif: Mc Cutchen.

8.       Peters R. S. (1966), Ethics and Education, London: Allen and Unwin

9.       Downey, J. B. and Kelly, A. B. (1982), Moral Education, London: Harper and Row

10.   Scarf, Peter (1978), Readings in Moral Education, Minnipolis: Winston Press Inc.

11.     Ode L. K. (1976), Shiksha ki Darshanik Prasthabhoomi, Jaipur: Rajasthan Granth Academy.

12.     Wilson, J., Williams, N. and Sugarman, B. (1967), Introduction to Moral Education, Penguin Books.

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 141                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Objectives:  

 

1.      To enable the student teacher understand about the concept of environmental education.

2.      To develop in the student teacher a sense of awareness about the environmental pollution, and possible hazards and its causes and remedies.

3.      To develop a sense of responsibility towards conservation of environment,                   bio-diversity and sustainable development.

4.      To develop reasonable understanding about the role of school and education in fostering the idea of learning to live in harmony with nature.

5.      To enable the students to understand about the various measures available to conserve the environment for sustaining the development.

 

Course Contents

 

UNIT I

 

·        Environment : meaning, scope and nature of environmental education.

·        Types of environmental pollution

 

UNIT II

 

·        Causes and effects of environmental hazard, global and local: environmental pollution and its remedies.

·        Green house effect – an impending catastrophe.

·        Ozone layer depletion – environmental threat, acid rain, pillar melting, rise of sea level and their implications.

 

UNIT III

 

·        Salient features of environmental awareness through education: programmes of environmental education for secondary school children.

·        Programmes of environmental education for attitude changes among the children.

 

UNIT IV

 

·        Biodiversity: Conservation of genetic diversity. An important environment priority: learning to live in harmony with nature.

 

UNIT V

·        Role of School in environmental conservation and sustainable development.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

POPULATION EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 142                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Objectives:

 

2.      To develop in the student teacher an understanding of the concept,  need and importance of population education.

3.      To enable the students to understand various terminology connected with population studies and factors responsible for population growth.

4.      To develop an awareness in the student teacher of the implications of population growth on various aspects of social functioning.

5.      To help student teacher to understand the effect of unchecked growth of population on the depletion of natural resources from the environment.

6.      To help student teacher to appreciate the role of population education as an educational intervention for upgrading the quality of social functioning.

 

Course Contents

 

UNIT I

 

·        Introduction: Nature and scope of population education: meaning, concept need, scope, importance and objectives.

 

UNIT II

 

·        Population dynamics: distribution and density, population composition: Age, sex, rural, urban, literacy – all India.

·        Factors affecting population growth: fertility, mortality and migration (mobility).

 

UNIT III

 

·        Population and quality of life: Population in relation to: socio-economic development, health status, nutrition health services and education.

·        Effect of unchecked growth of population on natural resources and environment.

·        Population and literacy campaigns in India.

 

UNIT IV

 

·        Population education in Schools: Scope of population education in schools.

·        Integration of population education with the general school curriculum.

 

 

 

 

UNIT V

 

·        Methods and approaches: Inquiry approach, observation, self-study, discussions, assignments.

·        Use of mass-media: Newspapers, Radio, Television, A.V. Aids.

 

UNIT VI

 

·        Role of teachers: Teacher role in creating awareness of the consequences of population problems, inculcating new values and attitudes leading to modification of student behaviour.

·        Working with community of build awareness.

 


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 143                                                    L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3

 

Objectives:

 

1.      To acquaint the student teachers with the concept and concerns of educational administration.

2.      To develop an understanding of the role of the headmaster and the teacher in school management.

3.      To enable the students to understand to concept at importance of communication and its possible barriers in educational administration.

4.      To enable the student teacher to critically analyse the administrative scenario in relation to the functioning of the other secondary schools of the area.

5.      To acquaint the student teacher with the scientific practices of educational management and keep him to apply it in work situation.

 

Course contents

 

UNIT I

 

·        Conceptual framework : Concept of educational administration.

·        Concept of educational management human beings as inputs, process and products inputs.

·        Nature, objectives and scope of educational administration.

 

UNIT II

 

·        Role and functions of headmaster/teacher: Basic functions of administration – planning, organizing directing and controlling.

·        Maintenance of discipline, control management.

·        Co-ordination and growth development.

·        Supervision and inspection, defects in the present supervision and inspection.

·        Scope of educational supervision.

·        Types of supervision.

·        Providing guidance; leadership function.

·        Crisis in management

·        Decision making

 

UNIT III

 

·        Communication in Educational Administration: Role of communication in effective management and administration.

·        Methods of communication.

·        Barriers of communication in educational administration.

·        Overcoming barriers to communication and effective communication in educational administration.

 

UNIV IV

 

·        Management of Schools: Role of headmaster in planning of school activities, approaches to management – manpower approach, cost benefit approach, social demand approach, social justice approach.

·        Involvement of other functionaries and agencies in the preparation of a plan.

·        Delegation of authority and accountability.

·        Role of the headmaster in monitoring, supervision and evaluation.

·        Role of the headmaster in motivating the staff, in resolution of interpersonal conflicts.

·        Role of the headmaster in creating resources and managing financial matters.

·        Optimum use of available resources for growth and development of the school.

·        Staff development programmes.

·        Role of teachers in school management and administration.

 

UNIT V

 

·        Educational administration in the state: The administrative structure in the field of education in the state.

·        Control of school education in the state – a critical analysis.

·        Functions of the state government in relation to secondary and higher secondary schools.

·        Functions of the board of secondary education in controlling secondary schools.

·        Problems of secondary school administration in government schools.


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

EDUCATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 144                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3


Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

SCHOOL EDUCATION

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 145                                                          L-3       T/P-0    Credits-3


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING SKILL DEVELOPMENT - I

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 151                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 4

 

 

 

All the students will undergo full time intensive School experience programme for thirty working days between November and January as per the convenience of respective Practice Schools.

-          Students are required to prepare twenty lesson plans for each pedagogical course.

-          Minimum of 50% of the Lessons delivered by the students will be observed and evaluated by the teacher supervisor from the respective faculty from the Teacher Education Institute/College.

-          External examination for this course shall be conducted by the University simultaneously. External evaluation will be done by a Board of Examiners comprising of an Internal and an External examiner appointed by the University on the basis of relevant records such as lesson plans, teaching aids, used during the practice teaching, observation record, school profile etc.

 

 

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

TEACHING SKILL DEVELOPMENT - II

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 152                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 4

 

 

 

All the students will undergo full time intensive School experience programme for thirty working days between November and January as per the convenience of respective Practice Schools.

-          Students are required to prepare twenty lesson plans for each pedagogical course.

-          Minimum of 50% of the Lessons delivered by the students will be observed and evaluated by the teacher supervisor from the respective faculty from the Teacher Education Institute/College.

-          External examination for this course shall be conducted by the University simultaneously. External evaluation will be done by a Board of Examiners comprising of an Internal and an External examiner appointed by the University on the basis of relevant records such as lesson plans, teaching aids, used during the practice teaching, observation record, school profile etc.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

PRACTICUM RELATED TO THEORY COURSES

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 153                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 8

 

 

TUTORIAL

I.                     Tutorials are organised structured interactive sessions group discussions, presentations leading to two assignments per subject/project. In case of assignments one shall be related to theory and record shall relate to the field investigation.

II.                   School Study Report

 

·         Study report an any one dimension of School Management Systems to be prepared during internship period.

·         Topic related to any aspect of School functioning to be decided in consultation with the teacher in change tutorial.

III.                  Psychology Practical Work

·         One case Study report to be prepared

·         Three psychology practicals records to be submitted as per the defined syllabus.

IV.        Practicum for Computers : Create a digital Unit Plan portfolio with the following elements:

·        Unit Plan

·        Teacher Multi media presentation

·        Student sample of multi media presentation

·        Support material for teacher and students

·        Evaluation rubrics for the student samples

 

Note:

 

1.      Component I shall be evaluated by the Internal Faculty.

2.      Component II and  III shall be evaluated jointly by the Internal & External Examiner appointed by the University.

3.     The students will be evaluated for component IV on the basis of the digital portfolio they create.

 


 

 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

SESSIONAL WORKS & VIVA VOCE

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 154                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 6

 

 

Each record shall carry equal marks:

 

I.                     Achievement Test Record – on the two School subjects taught by the student Construction, administration & evaluation upto correlation (Rank Method).

II.                   Critical appraisal of Text Book/Book Review.

III.                  Visual Education – Charts, Three dimensional model, college magazine or scrap – book.

IV.                The Viva – Voce will conducted on the basis of records generated under the above heads of activities and all the five activities.


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

WORK EXPERIENCE

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 155                                                          L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 2

 

 

 

I.                     Experience in a School based activity which the student-teacher could handle as a SUPW activity for students.

End product to be submitted for evaluation by external examiners.

II.                   Printing and Designing

III.                  Clay Modelling

IV.                Art & Craft Work

V.                  Electrical Gadget

VI.                Gardening

VII.               Cost effective teaching aids

VIII.             Setting up mathematics laboratory

 

 

Note: At least any two of the above activities to be offered by each student

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

CO-CURRICULUM ACTIVITIES & SPORTS

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 156                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 2

 

 

 

1.      Participation in college, University activities.

2.      Conceptualizing, conducting and reporting of two different kinds of events organised for School students during internship period.

3.      Project Report will be evaluated by in Board of examiners comprising of internal & external examiners appointed by the University.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

WORKING WITH THE COMMUNITYk

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 157                                              L-0       T/P-0    Credits – 2

 

 

·        Field work in any one community based programme of student teachers choice subject to administrative feasibility of the institution record to be maintained.

·        To be undertaken in consultation with and under the guidance of teacher incharge.

·        Some of the areas could be Universalisation of primary education, women’s empowerment, adult education environment education, population education, health awareness, community mobilization, PLA exercise, social mapping and socio-economic crimes among the urban slums, working with disadvantaged child population. Attachment with NGOs or social agency preparation of report.

 

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

 

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

Hindi

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 122                                              L-4       T/P-0    Credits – 4


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

English

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 123                                              L-4       T/P-0    Credits – 4

 

 

(a)   Theory

 

1.      The importance of providing special language course at the higher secondary level; language courses for science, medicine, engineering, journalism, law and literature, etc. specialised vocabulary and structure, different from literary texts.

2.      Place and objective of literature in a school course in English with special reference to the higher secondary level.

3.      Methods and materials for developing study skill in English literary-forms: essay, short one act-play and diary, letter, novel, long play and biography. Use of cultural context and dictionary and other relevant sources for better comprehensions; discussion and self study.

4.      Development of appreciation, skills of comprehension in relation to art of interpretation and the ways of developing the latter; development of judgement and evaluation of literary writing; relative importance of classics and popular literature in English.

5.      Developing wider reading interests. Procuring and using suitable library materials. Arranging displays of new books, book lists, book reviews and journals suitable for the pupils, organising other literary activities like discussion on various books read.

6.      Developing writing skills, exercise in current writing-grammar exercises, synthesis and transformation of sentences, paragraph writing, precis writing, note taking and reporting adapting and reviewing. Exercises in creative writing, free composition writing, letter writing, essay and dialogue writing, dramatic writing; diary entries and poems.

7.      Developing advanced oral skills. Exercises in reading with expression, literary texts of suitable poems, plays and stories. Speech training : elocution exercises; public speaking recitations, dramatic dialogue. Use of suitable audio-materials, recorded reading of literary text of various types, broadcasts and T.V. programmes on the above literary texts and authors. Use of language laboratories.

8.      Planning lessons in Prose, Poetry, Drama, Novel, etc., at various levels. Different techniques for detailed and not-detailed study, preparatory work, actual study and following up in various useful ways. Poetry and Drama presented orally; place and use of discussion and interpretation methods, rather than explanation; focussing on(a) Emotion and imagery in poetry lessons; (b) Character and incident in Drama and Novels (c) Idea and argument in essays.

9.      Evaluating achievements in English at the advanced level, using objective, short answer type and essay tests judiciously criteria for marking creative writings, methods of evaluating interest and extent in wider reading.

10.  Planning teachings of English at the Higher Secondary level; Allocation of adequate total time, proper provisioning in the time-table for various skills. Procurement of suitable books and other material for the School and Class Libraries and facility for pupils to use Audio-Visual Aids (T.V., Radio, Gramophone and Tape Recorder, etc.) on their own. Planning session, annual and occasional tests and their weightage in the final assessment. Professional growth and leadership in the field.

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)

 

 

Sanskrit

 

Course Code: B. Ed. 124                                              L-4       T/P-0    Credits – 4

 


 

Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi

 

Bachelor of Education (B. Ed.)